Wallstreet

How Wall Street reopened at the Philly Stock Market after 9-11

Warren West always worked for himself as a stock and options trader, at his Philadelphia firm of Greentree Brokerage. On Sept. 11, 2001, he entered his offices at 17th and Market as usual, before the market opening at 9:30 a.m.

Instead of his employees sipping coffee and preparing for trading, “no one was at their desks, but around the TV. They were all looking at the first tower [of the World Trade Center] burning,” he recalled. Then a second plane hit the South Tower, and “everyone picked up their stuff and just walked out. The streets here [in Philly] were

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Wall Street’s Art Cashin reflects on 9/11 and what it took to rebuild

A day before the 20th anniversary of 9/11, veteran trader Art Cashin reflected Friday on the impact of the terrorist attacks on Wall Street, the country and him personally.

Cashin, who has been an NYSE member since 1964, was in lower Manhattan on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001. He remained in the stock exchange building all day, even as the NYSE and Nasdaq did not open for trading, a rare occurrence, because of the attacks.

Phone service was severely impaired in Manhattan that day, but those at Cashin’s post somehow remained operational, he said Friday on CNBC’s “Squawk on

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9/11 Radically Transformed Wall Street And Lower Manhattan : NPR

People walk near the sight of Ground Zero and the One World Trade Center on Aug. 30. The Wall Street neighborhood changed drastically after the 9/11 attacks as banks moved out of what had long been their home.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images


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People walk near the sight of Ground Zero and the One World Trade Center on Aug. 30. The Wall Street neighborhood changed drastically after the 9/11 attacks as banks moved out of what had long been their home.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Wick Simmons, the former CEO of Nasdaq, started working on Wall

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Opinion | Why Must Wall Street Return to the Office?

To the Editor:

Re “You Can’t Learn the Art of Closing the Deal on Zoom,” by William D. Cohan (Opinion guest essay, Aug. 18):

Mr. Cohan’s cherished deal-making rooms are simply old boys’ clubs: centers of power dominated by white men and their personal networks.

While personal networks still matter in most areas of business, the internet has diffused some of this power. You no longer need entrance to a physical country club or Harvard Club meeting room if you can connect with decision makers online, on virtual networks like LinkedIn.

None of this is new to the Covid era.

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Asian Shares Slip as Fed Signals ‘Downshift’ in Economy | Business News

By ELAINE KURTENBACH, AP Business Writer

Shares fell in Asia on Thursday after further losses on Wall Street following a Federal Reserve report showing U.S. economic activity slowed this summer.

The report pointed to resurgent coronavirus cases and mounting supply chain problems and labor shortages — woes affecting many economies. Benchmarks fell in Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai and Sydney.

Japan extended its emergency measures to combat COVID-19 outbreaks until the end of September, as numbers of new cases have been declining only slowly, straining the healthcare system.

Chinese markets have been chilled by further moves by the government to strengthen

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Asian shares slip as Fed signals ‘downshift’ in economy

Shares fell in Asia on Thursday after further losses on Wall Street following a Federal Reserve report showing U.S. economic activity slowed this summer.

The report pointed to resurgent coronavirus cases and mounting supply chain problems and labor shortages — woes affecting many economies. Benchmarks fell in Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai and Sydney.

Japan extended its emergency measures to combat COVID-19 outbreaks until the end of September, as numbers of new cases have been declining only slowly, straining the healthcare system.

Chinese markets have been chilled by further moves by the government to strengthen controls over online businesses that thrived

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The Wall Street JournalA Generation of American Men Give Up on College: ‘I Just Feel Lost’The number of men enrolled at two- and four-year colleges has fallen behind women by record levels, in a widening education gap across the …1 day ago

The Wall Street JournalA Generation of American Men Give Up on College: ‘I Just Feel Lost’The number of men enrolled at two- and four-year colleges has fallen behind
women by record levels, in a widening education gap across the …1 day ago… Read More

Wall Street scales new heights, powered by tech stocks

  • Tech stocks lead gains; Apple hits record high
  • August private jobs growth misses expectations
  • PVH Corp top S&P 500 gainer on raising full-year forecast
  • Indexes gain: Dow 0.01%, S&P 0.29%, Nasdaq 0.76%

Sept 1 (Reuters) – Wall Street’s main indexes marched on, with the S&P 500 and Nasdaq hitting record highs on Wednesday, as fresh technology stock buying combined with hopes the Federal Reserve would keep the stimulus taps open after weaker-than-expected private payrolls data.

Technology stocks (.SPLRCT), which tend to benefit from a low-rate environment, were up 0.5%. Apple Inc (AAPL.O) rose 1.2% to its second record high this

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How the first disabled and woman-owned NYSE floor broker is changing Wall Street

Cynthia DiBartolo’s journey to the New York Stock Exchange floor was fraught with challenges and difficulty.

In July 2021, DiBartolo’s firm, Tigress Financial Partners, became the first disabled and woman-owned floor broker to become a member of the NYSE.

Floor brokers are members of firms who execute trades on the exchange floor on behalf of the firm’s clients. They are physically present on the trading floor and are active during the New York Stock Exchange opening and closing auctions.

Tigress Financial Partners has been co-manager or selling group member on more than 620 IPO and secondary transactions with an aggregate

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Trump Organization Employees to Testify Before Manhattan Grand Jury

Two Trump Organization employees are expected to testify before a grand jury this week as Manhattan prosecutors seek to advance their criminal investigation into former President Donald Trump’s business affairs, according to people familiar with the matter.

Matthew Calamari Jr., the Trump Organization’s corporate director of security and the son of the company’s chief operating officer, was served a subpoena for his testimony this week, the people said. Prosecutors have examined an apartment Mr. Calamari received from the Trump Organization and how he reported that apartment on his taxes, the people said.

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